Diana Heise

BIO

My work has been exhibited in galleries and festivals internationally, including at the Brooklyn Museum, the Kemper Museum, the Film Anthology Archives, Cantor Art Center, Institut Français de Maurice, Soho20 Chelsea Gallery, Des Moines Art Center, the H&R Block Artspace, Drain and Cinemazzurro, Ancona Italy, among others. I am a recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship in the Creative and Performing Arts, a Performance Art Fund Grant from the Franklin Furnace Inc. as well as a Presidential Fellowship at the American University in Cairo. I have spoken about my work at venues such as the Parsons School of Art and Design, Stanford University and the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art. I hold a MFA in Photography, Video and Related Media from the School of Visual Arts in New York, NY and a BA in Art History from Vassar College. I am an Assistant Professor of Photography and Filmmaking at the Kansas City Art Institute. I live and work in North Hero VT, Kansas City MO and Beau Bassin Mauritius.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

My practice explores the connective potential and paradoxes of our collective cultural and environmental existence. My process begins with deep observation of people and ecological contexts, observations made both with my eyes and sensations in my body. I embed myself in cultural practices in order to form deep connections and understanding; most recently in Mauritius where I have learned the local Kreol, been entrenched in the cultural heritage movement, and educated myself on the ecological concerns of the area. I write and make in response to the situations that I experience, observe or read about, tackling embedded systems of colonization, whether that be the colonization of the female body, global history which speaks the story of the oppressor and ecocide.

These processes of procurement manifest as multi-pronged projects that generate physical performative interactions, cinematic experiences, books, loose narratives and interventions.  These projects are intended to engage audiences with their sense of responsibility to their social and environmental world. By using seeds, plants, animals bones and human hands, I wish to return our focus to the care needed to support the growth of seeds, the cleansing of the mind and the awareness required to participate ethically in our global-local society.

Links to previous work:

Breath Take (2011-2012)

Take Only What You Can Give (2011)

Implant (2011)

Town Topic (2009-2010)

 

Diana Heise, Lamer Nou Fer/The Sea We Make, Extract of HD video, 2015., Images courtesy of the artist.

Diana Heise, Lamer Nou Fer/The Sea We Make, Extract of HD video, 2015., Images courtesy of the artist.

ABOUT THE WORK

The Sea We Make generates aesthetic experiences for participants in and outside the African island nation of Mauritius to bear witness to shifts caused by climate change. The project addresses Mauritian lagoon ecology as an indicator of grave impacts. Ocean acidification is rapidly dissolving the corals, which is the basis of the lagoon ecosystem. Our research has focused on the health of fish, the effects on their declined population on the artisanal fishing community and these implications of climate change on the social structures in Mauritius. This project will manifest as three aspects: information sharing events, museum installations and digital takeaways.


Nirveda Alleck

BIO

Born in 1975, Nirveda Alleck is a multidisciplinary artist from Mauritius. She undertook her undergraduate studies at Michaelis School of Fine Art in South Africa, and did her MFA at the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland in 2001. She has participated in international workshops in Namibia, South Africa, India, Lebanon, Mali and Mauritius, and has held residencies at the Bag Factory Studios in Johannesburg as well as in Scotland, Reunion Island, Namibia, Mali, and Mauritius. She was offered a Francis Greenburger Fellowship in 2011 to undertake a residency at Art Omi in the USA. Nirveda Alleck has participated in numerous international exhibitions: Diplomatic Immunity in NY in 2001, 11th Triennale India in 2005, Pan African Arts Festival in Algeria in 2009, Francophonie Games in Beirut, Arts Actuels Biennale in Reunion Island, World Festival of Black Arts in Dakar. She was part of Focus 11 Contemporary Art Africa at Art Basel in 2011, and also received in the same year, the Bank One Emma Award in Arts and Culture in Mauritius. Her work was amongst the 3 shortlisted for the FNB Johannesburg Art Fair Prize in 2011. Alleck was a laureate at the Dak'Art Biennale 2010, where she was awarded the Soleil d'Afrique Prize, and she was again part of the Dakar Biennale in 2012. Her recent video works have been show at the College des Bernardins in Paris, Marakesh Biennale Parallel projects, Africa Utopia in London, Ben Uri Gallery in the UK, and Analogue Eye at the National Arts Festival in South Africa and in Mannheim Germany. She is currently a part time lecturer in Fine Arts at the MGI, University of Mauritius.

Nirveda Alleck, Together We Shall Sail the World, site-specific installation with bunker bed and wool

Nirveda Alleck, Together We Shall Sail the World, site-specific installation with bunker bed and wool

ABOUT THE WORK

My work uses the support of paintings, videos, installations and performance.

Over the years, my work has been about discovering and analyzing people and cultures from different places, and reflecting upon the characteristics that are distinct to them. I have worked with oral narratives and by interacting with my subjects, I attempt to synthesize preconceptions with the real, both in installations, and paintings.

In the Continuum series, done in South Africa, Mauritius, Beirut, the Chagos Islands, Reunion Island, Mali and the USA, I have been fixating on one constant: the human subject. By the erasing and whitening out of the background of these paintings (and videos), the immediate visual context is negated. But by the same token, this augments the sense of the presence of these subjects, who are fixed on the surface of the canvases. The act of painting photorealistic figures is not new, but lifting the figures out of their adjacent visual backgrounds makes them part of a larger 'diasporic' state of being, almost a conceptual family. A mock-anthropological thoroughness in referencing the photographic material that I use as a source ensures that there is no sentimentality. The portraying of these subjects eschews a colonial gaze, refuses a rapport de force, revealing instead, the invisible forces that give shape to subjectivities. At the same time, lifting a tree out of its natural state and into a gravity defying position allows for meaning to be created and permeated, as stories that unfold over generations.

Performance and imagined rituals are increasingly part of my practice. These are silent performances, which are recorded on video and shown as such. I am interested in all that is ephemeral and that disperses itself, elements that trigger new meaning like water and wool or dandelion seeds. I feel a lot that the construction of meaning is vital in not only my work, but in life and the way we live it. The element of water is predominant and acts as a vehicle for thought and purity. 

Related Work:

nirvedaalleck.com 



Shiraz Bayjoo

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BIO

Shiraz Bayjoo is a London based multidisciplinary artist, originally from Mauritius. In recent years he has undertaken a series of community related residencies, which has led his practice towards increased social engagement. Bayjoo studied at the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff and was artist in residence at Whitechapel gallery during 2011. He has exhibited with Tate Britain and the Institute for International Visual Art, and is a recipient of the Gasworks fellowship.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

“My works explore the tensions and dialogue that arise through processing the emotive icons of disappearing and fracturing cultural and religious identities through the language and gestures of abstraction. Tracing these narratives I find a personal resonance within the dynamism of groups created through divergent shared affinities. I have spent the last five years developing a discourse that combines research with communities and archives; culminating in a multi disciplinary practice of video, painting and installation. Images are broken down, re-explored and re-situated. These compositions are subtle and removed from their literal contexts, lending themselves to an idea of universal experience.

I am interested in ideas of nationhood and the exploration of identity and histories through using photographs, and artefacts stored in public and personal archives. I am concerned with how the wider public's perception of events and histories is influenced or differs from what is conveyed or captured in the more dynamic collections held in archives.  Through investigating themes of migration and trade, the work explores these complex colonial histories and relationships, and enquires into the challenge of authoring of collective identity in the post-colonial world.”

ABOUT THE WORK

Rooted in the historical, visual, and natural histories of Mauritius, Ile de France is a multifaceted project concerned with the colonial past of the small island nation. Exhibiting as a multimedia installation, the project features reclaimed wood and furniture, painted and superimposed with archival images and portraits, accompanied by a film that functions as both a backdrop and an introduction to the themes and landscapes of the work.

In dialogue with the complexities of Mauritius’s past and present, Ile de France charts the industrial and political development of colonial Mauritius against the fracturing and hybridizing identities of its people. Ile de France inevitably becomes part of the archive it draws meaning from, where through contemporary society a more complex layering of cultural takeovers and integrations have occurred and remain visible today.

The ocean, however, remains the constant, real owner of these isles; featured in panning film shots, there is a sense that this history is only a footnote in a greater story.


ALEX DUNCAN

“I am fascinated by where and how we place ourselves in the world, the position of the body in relationship to other objects and situations.”

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Alex Duncan was born in Swansea in 1985. He studied at Swansea College of Art (UTSWD) and in 2015 completed an MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London. Alexander works primarily with sculpture, sought objects, video and photography, exhibiting recently in the London Open at the Whitechapel Gallery; Adjacent Realities at the Austrian Culture Forum, London and Mediterranea 17, La Fabricca del Vapore, Milan. He was the recipient of the 2015 Wakelin Award, organized by the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery in Swansea and was awarded a Royal British Society of Sculptors bursary.


ABOUT THE WORK

Cove (2007-2012) articulates Duncan’s interest in spatial and relational positions by using polyurethane foam, which he associates with “in-between” spaces such as structural insulation, and how this collects in coves, inlets and slips, themselves forgotten in-between spaces in the landscape. The mounds of polyurethane pellets collected and displayed by Duncan convey this material’s violent and ubiquitous presence in the landscape.  Like Swimming (2014-15) expresses a similar interest in buoyant materials, where Duncan gives ordinary pool floats new weight by casting them in concrete. The deceptive weight of these ‘floats’ is explored in the video Wavy Gravy (2014), which shows motion in a densely packed wave pool, with bodies rising and falling engaged with their own changing understanding of their own weight, exploring realities and artificialities of motion and perception. Netsuke, made with contemporary netsuke carver Peter Welsh, also engages with artificiality by referring to the design of a plastic soy sauce bottle that mimics traditional netsuke carving. The design is “recycled” by these artists, who carve it from a ram horn and mammoth’s tusk.

Website: http://www.alexanderpaulduncan.com/


JULIA DAVIS

“The primary focus of my research investigates the perceptions of and relationships between places, spaces and human habitation. My questions revolve around how these perceptions underpin our sense of self as well as how landscape is cultural space – a space formed by and informing culture.”

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Julia Davis is a site-specific artist based in Sydney, Australia. Over the past decade Davis’ work has been installed in salt lakes, deserts, coastal precincts, parklands, galleries and built environments. Her practice explores the perceptions and relationships between objects, places and spaces. More recently, Davis’ work has attended to the viewer’s experiential reading of space in terms of temporality and duration. She has exhibited in Australia, Germany, Italy and Spain, and is the recipient of numerous awards including the NAVA NSW artist grant (2011), the Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Award (2007), the Woollahra Sculpture Prize (2006) and the NGSW Director’s prize (2002). She currently teaches sculpture at TAFE and holds an MVA from Sydney College of Arts.

 

Julia Davis, Consilience: as the world turns, 2013/4. HD Time lapse video, stereo sound . 07:49 minute loop, Edition of 5 Concept/performance/edit: Julia Davis, Camera: Alex Cherney, Sound: Paul Huntingford, Composit: Matt Fezz Thanks to NASA for extracts of sound from Voyager 1 & 11’s first recording of interstellar space and encounter with Saturn 1980. Images courtesy of the artist

Julia Davis, Consilience: as the world turns, 2013/4. HD Time lapse video, stereo sound . 07:49 minute loop, Edition of 5
Concept/performance/edit: Julia Davis, Camera: Alex Cherney, Sound: Paul Huntingford, Composit: Matt Fezz
Thanks to NASA for extracts of sound from Voyager 1 & 11’s first recording of interstellar space and encounter with Saturn 1980. Images courtesy of the artist

ABOUT THE WORK

Consilience: as the world turns (2013/14) explores the effect of time on understandings of the body in relation to landscape and how this underpins our sense of self and place. She often works in ‘active‘ landscapes such as deserts, volcanic areas, coastal precincts and salt lakes and is interested in the idea that landscape is cultural space – a space informed by and informing culture. In geological time, the landscape moves, pulses and crashes in processes of coming into and out of existence. The ‘active’ places she refers to mirror the fragile human experience of movement, instability, rhythm, reflection and change. In her work, geological time and human perception merge into a single spatial experience and take us closer to a sense of the world as our place.

Website: www.juliadavis.com.au

Julia Davis Consilience was featured in the first Ephemeral Coast exhibition. She remains a collaborator on the project.


Pamela Longobardi

“I am a seeker, documenter, cataloger and communicator of my particular time walking (and swimming) on this planet: our global culture is in the process of life-altering change, and I feel that my work bears witness to this.” 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Pam Longobardi is an internationally acclaimed artist, scientist, and activist currently living and working in Atlanta, and is a Professor of Art at Georgia State University. In both public and private collections, with exhibitions across the globe, in museums, galleries and public spaces, Longobardi continues her collection, examination and exposition of the physical marker of the Anthropocene, the drifting plastic object. In 2014, Longobardi was awarded the title of Distinguished University Professor, and has been named Oceanic Society’s Artist-In-Residence.


ABOUT THE WORK

The Drifters Project is a collaborative global artistic research-based initiative involving the accumulation, documentation, and transformation of oceanic plastic into installations and photography. Longobardi provides us with a visual statement about the engine of global consumption and the impact of plastic objects on the world’s most remote places and creatures. With Ephemeral Coast, Longobardi will speak to her Drifters Project in Ottawa, Canada, alongside the first Canadian exhibition of her work. She is also a contributor to a workshop held at the University of Ottawa to engage scholars, researchers and activists in interdisciplinary discussions around the changing state of the world’s oceans and coastlines.

Website: http://www.pamlongobardi.com/

Pam Longobardi was the ‘Feature Artist’ in the Junk Ocean issue of Drain Magazine, which was published in dialogue with Ephemeral Coast. Celina Jeffery also interviewed her in this issue which can be found here:

http://drainmag.com/pam-longobardi-the-ocean-gleaner/

 

 

 

FERN THOMAS

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

Fern Thomas is based out of Swansea, Wales, UK. Rooted in the processes and principles of Social Sculpture, her work explores the potency and transformational capacities of the image in its broadest sense and interrogates her relationship with the ecological, archetypal, and mythological world. Manifesting in action – live or documented – her process-led and intuitive explorations often take the form of a physical interaction or ‘meeting’ between herself and a place, a dream, a history or another being.

Thomas is the winner of Mostyn Open (2011), was a recipient of the Arts and Humanities Research Council Award (2011/2012), was awarded the Interdisciplinary Arts Prize (2013) at Oxford Brookes University for her work during her Masters in Social Sculpture, and received a Creative Wales Award in 2014 to support her ongoing research into participatory forms and their relationship with sustainability. Thomasreceived her MA in Social Sculpture from Oxford Brookes University, working with Shelley Sacks, where she developed the post-apocalyptic research unit Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands.

She co-initiated the collaborative and pedagogical groups Art’s Birthday Wales and Forever Academy, works closely with her key collaborator Owen Griffiths, and is a member of the Social Sculpture Research Unit based in Oxford, UK.

Fern Thomas, From the Watchtower Radio Station, 2014, Audio. Spoken word/ sonic interpretation, Publication: Printed by Like Lichen 

Fern Thomas, From the Watchtower Radio Station, 2014, Audio. Spoken word/ sonic interpretation, Publication: Printed by Like Lichen 

ABOUT THE WORK

From the Watchtower is an unfolding process-led research work that will develop across the duration of the Ephemeral Coast exhibition. It will see the transformation of citizen into learner/observer, into active participant.

Expanding on a daily practice of watching the sea from her top floor flat overlooking Swansea Bay, the ‘Watchtower’ will be activated by Thomas through a series of day-long observations of the sea.

Across several weeks, set days will be dedicated to the act of observing the sea or ‘keeping watch’ from a high window overlooking the sea where shifting tides, colours, and unknown phenomenology will be observed. Set within the context of an ‘Ephemeral Coast’, From the Watchtower will explore our relationship with the sea, the potential future of the oceans and the processes of understanding through observing. Working with an imagined future, the work will also question what ‘keeping watch’ of the sea might mean.

At the end of each day observations and thoughts will be transformed into a spoken word/sonic interpretation of the day which will be made available online as a download from the From the Watchtower Radio Station. Participants are encouraged to upload the sound works to their mobile devices and take a walk across Swansea Bay.

Those who also view the sea from their homes will be invited to participate in a ‘shift’ at the watchtower, where they can share with Thomas their observations.

A small publication, published by LikeLichen Press, will be made available at the end of the exhibition.

View the updates and download the sound works from: www.thesefuturefields.eu/fromthewatchtower


GEMMA COPP

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

I work predominately with film and installation, often filming in isolated and secluded places or places perceived to be so by the viewer. My work aims to raise a flux of visceral emotions relating to identity and basic human emotions and concerns.

Gemma Copp is a Welsh artist, who currently resides in Swansea, her city of birth. Graduating with a BA in Fine Art from Swansea Metropolitan University in 2006, Copp went on to complete an MA in Contemporary Dialogues in 2009 at the same University. Copp has recently taken part in the Glynn Vivian’s Artist in Residence program. Copp has shown work nationally and internationally and has recently exhibited work at the Talbot Rice Gallery in Edinburgh, and at the Mannheim Film Festival in Germany, where she received a special commendation from the judges. She was awarded Welsh Artist of the Year in 2012.

Gemma Copp, Leaving Tide, 2014, Film, 40 mins.

Gemma Copp, Leaving Tide, 2014, Film, 40 mins.

ABOUT THE WORK

With its continuous body of salt water covering most of the earth’s surface, the sea is seen as a geophysical body with the tidal rhythms acting as its lungs. The sea is a constant reminder of life, where its continuous tidal motions breathe existence into nature’s habitat and fuel the cycle of regeneration. But what if that were to stop? Life is given value because of its transient and impermanent nature, and the coastline can be just as fragile and ephemeral. What if the rhythm were to be damaged and the cycle broken? Would nature’s balance disappear with the low tide, never to return? Within the piece you see a melancholic, motionless figure, dressed in black, with her back to the viewer. It appears that she is stood, balancing on top of the sea, as the waves repeatedly roll around her. The sea appears to be in balance at this point but as the once high tide turns to low tide and disburses around the figure, it gives the impression that something menacing is about to happen. The colour and focus of the horizon, that once was clear and inspiring, creating feelings of happiness and limitless possibilities, instead now offers the viewer visceral feelings of concern and desolation.


JULIA DAVIS

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

The primary focus of my research investigates the perceptions of and relationships between places, spaces and human habitation. My questions revolve around how these perceptions underpin our sense of self as well as how landscape is cultural space – a space formed by and informing culture.

BIO

Julia Davis is a site-specific artist based in Sydney, Australia. Over the past decade Davis’ work has been installed in salt lakes, deserts, coastal precincts, parklands, galleries and built environments. Her practice explores the perceptions and relationships between objects, places and spaces. More recently, Davis’ work has attended to the viewer’s experiential reading of space in terms of temporality and duration. She has exhibited in Australia, Germany, Italy and Spain, and is the recipient of numerous awards including the NAVA NSW artist grant (2011), the Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Award (2007), the Woollahra Sculpture Prize (2006) and the NGSW Director’s prize (2002). She currently teaches sculpture at TAFE and holds an MVA from Sydney College of Arts.

www.juliadavis.com.au

Julia Davis, Consilience: as the world turns, 2013/14, Time-lapse HD video, stereo sound. 07:49 (loop). Concept/ Performance: Julia Davis, Camera: Alex Chemey, Composting: Matt Fezz,, Sound: Paul Huntingford, Julia Davis Thanks to NASA for extracts of sound from Voyager 1 & 11’s first recording of interstellar space and encounter with Saturn 1980.

Julia Davis, Consilience: as the world turns, 2013/14, Time-lapse HD video, stereo sound. 07:49 (loop). Concept/ Performance: Julia Davis, Camera: Alex Chemey, Composting: Matt Fezz,, Sound: Paul Huntingford, Julia Davis Thanks to NASA for extracts of sound from Voyager 1 & 11’s first recording of interstellar space and encounter with Saturn 1980.

ABOUT THE WORK

Julia Davis’s work explores the effect of time on understandings of the body in relation to landscape and how this underpins our sense of self and place. She often works in ‘active‘ landscapes such as deserts, volcanic areas, coastal precincts and salt lakes and is interested in the idea that landscape is cultural space – a space informed by and informing culture.

In geological time, the landscape moves, pulses and crashes in processes of coming into and out of existence. The often violent imagery of turbulent volcanic ash clouds used in recent works translates here in this vast Southern Hemisphere sky, which elicits contradictory feelings of foreboding and rapture. Tension between anticipated loss and subsequent renewal, as well as the duality of processes that create and destroy, corrode and protect are ongoing interests in Davis’s art practice. The ‘active’ places she refers to mirror the fragile human experience of movement, instability, rhythm, reflection and change. In her work, geological time and human perception merge into a single spatial experience and take us closer to a sense of the world as our place.

You can also view Julia’s work produced during an IASKA’s residency in Western Australia, SPACED: art out of place, 2010

Julia at SPACED: art out of place


STEFHAN CADDICK

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

 I am interested in the savagery of the natural world, misremembered episodes from political history, the three-minute single and not knowing the way. My work, whilst taking a range of forms from film to installation, drawing to performance, is unified by an intellectual and aesthetic rigour. I approach the act of making work with an interest in the process itself and will sometimes invent ornate, often ridiculous systems or methodologies as a mode of production. My work is at once darkly melancholic and blackly comedic.

Stefhan Caddick is a Wales-based artist who works in video, installation and performance. His practice is often a collaborative engagement that sources its materials from institutions, communities and individuals. With an interest in process itself, Caddick invents ornate systems of production that are both melancholic and comedic. He is the recent recipient of the Major Creative Wales Award from the Art Council of Wales (2013), and has been commissioned for various artistic projects including Pickle Lane (2013) at the Fourth Wall Festival, Ghost Parade (2012) at the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad Festival and The Magician’s Cat (2004) at the Welsh National Opera. Caddick is currently a visiting lecturer in Creative Sound and Music at the University of Wales College, where he also earned his MA in Documentary Photography.

Stefhan Caddick, Drowned World, 2014, Plywood boat. Cradle and bespoke wallpaper, Birch plywood, wood, cloth, miscellaneous materials, wallpaper

Stefhan Caddick, Drowned World, 2014, Plywood boat. Cradle and bespoke wallpaper, Birch plywood, wood, cloth, miscellaneous materials, wallpaper

ABOUT THE WORK

 “The low night sounds of the jungle drifted over the water; occasionally a marmoset gibbered or the iguanas shrieked distantly from their eyries in the distant office blocks. Myriads of insects festered along the water-line, momentarily disturbed as the swells rolled in … slapping at the canted sides of the pontoon.” JG Ballard

Taking as its starting point Ballard’s novel of the same name, Drowned World comprises a functional, scaled down prototype of a junk rigged floating survival craft. The craft sits at the centre of a fictional, faceted environment, reminiscent of early video games. Like Ballard’s 1962 novel, the installation asks questions about what happens to people when the edge is redrawn; and the enduring allure of natural catastrophe – ‘the-end-is-nigh’-ism – as evident in the biblical flood story as it is in contemporary debates about climate change. It also stumbles into issues about migration and whether there’s a survivalist thread hidden within the contemporary ‘maker’.

www.stefhancaddick.co.uk

 

DR. MARY H GAGEN

 

Mary H. Gagen, who is an Associate Professor of Geography at Swansea University wrote an essay called Navigating Coastal Climate Change for the Ephemeral Coast, S. Wales catalogue. Here is a short extract which describes the relationship between her life and research on the Welsh coast.

I was born and raised in Manchester, a large post-industrial town in the north of England. At the age of 17 my family moved to Mumbles, a nineteenth century Welsh fishing village, close to Swansea. The sound of the sea kept me awake at night, and I yearned for the sound of planes landing at Manchester’s International Airport. Two decades later, I cannot imagine living away from the coast. My coastal years formed my decision to train as a physical geographer, and finally as a climate scientist. The beach near to my new home was – unbeknownst to me at the time – one of the most famous sites in the UK to anyone studying the sea level changes that accompanied the last great ice age.

Image and text courtesy of the author, Ephemeral Coast and punctum books.

Image and text courtesy of the author, Ephemeral Coast and punctum books.

She is a member of C3W, the Climate Change Consortium of Wales and in response to the first exhibition, Dr. Gagen brought groups of students to participate in climate change awareness activities in the gallery.


Ian Buchanan 

Ian Buchanan is Professor of Cultural Studies at the University of Wollongong, Australia. He is the founding editor of Deleuze Studies and the author of the Dictionary of Critical Theory (OUP).
He contributed the essay, ‘The Ephemeral Coast: On the Edge of the Otherly Realm’ in the Ephemeral Coast, S. Wales, 2014.

Extract:
Water is endlessly fascinating to artists and poets, and indeed some of our greatest artists and poets have also been great swimmers (Lord Byron is the most well-known of the poet swimmers, Swinburne was no slouch either), but that fascination has always been tempered by fear and the deeply felt sense that water is not a human domain (this was Shelley’s view, which he effectively proved by drowning – Shelley wasn’t the only poet to drown himself, either, Hart Crane also chose this mode of death, as did Virginia Woolf).[1] To swim, then, is to immerse oneself in an otherly realm that is both deadly to humans and teeming with its own life as great ocean-explorers like Jacques Cousteau and Hans Hass revealed in the middle of the 20th century.

Celina Jeffery and Ian Buchanan co-edited the ‘Junk Ocean’ of Drain Magazine, which was launched in January 2016.  He also wrote the essay, What Must We Do About Rubbish?

 http://drainmag.com/what-must-we-do-about-rubbish/

[1] Sprawson 1992: 32-33; 99-101; 103-105.